Author Bio

Amanda Deering earned her bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s degree in plant biology from Central Michigan University. She completed her Ph.D. at Purdue University in food microbiology and food safety specializing in fresh produce food safety. Her research focuses on examining internalization of human pathogenic bacteria in plants, as well as routes of contamination that can contribute to plants harboring pathogenic bacteria. Amanda works closely with industry to develop and test novel sanitization treatments that can be used for fresh produce. She leads the Purdue SafeProduceIN team that works in Indiana to deliver GAPs trainings for growers/producers, coordinating education and training for county and campus staff in GAPs and related food safety needs, and developing resources that address the real-time needs of growers in Indiana.

Sessions


Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Purdue Extension Food Safety Training Hub: A Space for Hands-On Produce Safety Training- Tari Gary, Amanda Deering, James Scott Monroe, Rhonda Taylor, Joanna Beck, Jennifer Coleman and William Tuley

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule ushered in a new era in fresh fruit and vegetable production. The science-based regulation mandates new requirements for growing, harvesting, handling, and storage of fresh produce. When Safe Produce Indiana began offering classroom-based courses to educate produce growers on the Rule, the team did not have

Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Detection of Culturable Bacteria in Greenhouse Grown Romaine Lettuce Using the Light Scattering Technology (BEAM)- Hansel Mina and Amanda Deering

Technologies for rapid detection and identification of bacterial communities, especially for pathogens, are crucial for securing a safe food supply. The light-scattering technology (BEAM) incorporates the traditional culture-based approach as a part of the detection procedure and is an easier and faster method for detection and identification of bacteria based on the morphological characteristics of

Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Impact of the Growing Location on the Microbial Load of Different Varieties of Cantaloupes- Hansel Mina, Amanda Deering, Petrus Langenhoven

Cantaloupes are perishable and susceptible to microbiological contamination during production, harvest, and distribution. Since cantaloupes are grown on the ground, preharvest safety concerns come from the bacterial load that they can harbor from the soil and the contamination with foodborne pathogens carried by irrigation water, manure-based fertilizers and wild animals. The study examined the microbial

Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Purdue Extension Food Safety Training Hub: A Space for Hands-On Produce Safety Training- Tari Gary, Amanda Deering, James Scott Monroe, Rhonda Taylor, Joanna Beck, Jennifer Coleman, William Tuley

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule ushered in a new era in fresh fruit and vegetable production. The science-based regulation mandates new requirements for growing, harvesting, handling, and storage of fresh produce. When Safe Produce Indiana began offering classroom-based courses to educate produce growers on the Rule, the team did not have