Author Bio

Wenjing Guan is a horticultural specialist at Purdue University. She conducts applied research in commercial vegetable production, focusing on watermelon, cantaloupe, as well as season extension of diverse vegetables using different plastic cultural systems. Her specialty is vegetable grafting, a technique used on tomato, cucumber, watermelon and cantaloupe for improving crops’ tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. She leads annual watermelon and cantaloupe variety trials at Southwest Indiana. Wenjing serves as the editor of the Purdue Extension Publication Vegetable Crops Hotline Newsletter. Contact: guan40@purdue.edu 812-886-0198 352-870-4696 (cell)

Sessions


Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Cucumber Grafting technique- Wenjing Guan

Are you interested in grafting cucumber plants? This poster and demonstration introduce cucumber grafting technique in a small scale. You will see the grafting process and have an opportunity to graft the plants by yourself.

Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Tomato Grafting Technique- Wenjing Guan

Are you interested in grafting tomato plants? This poster and demonstration introduce a step-by-step technique for grafting tomato plants in a small scale. You will see the grafting process, and have an opportunity to graft the plants by yourself.

Wednesday - 1:00 pm-3:00 pm - Room: Atrium

Is grafting worth it for my operation? A Partial Cost Benefit Analysis of Early-Season Production of Grafted Seedless Cucumber in High Tunnels Orlando Rodriguez, Ariana Torres, and Wenjing Guan

We conducted a study to analyze the economic benefit of grafting seedless cucumber grown in high tunnels. A comparison of partial costs and returns between grafted and nongrafted cucumber was developed. Data included production costs, yield, and price of cucumber at different market channels. This data was used to develop a partial budget analyses and